book review, historical fiction, history

Review: Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier

  Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier is based on the life of Mary Anning, an early 19th century fossil hunter, collector, and paleontologist (although without a formal education.) I first discovered Mary Anning during a visit to the National History Museum in London. I was fascinated by this young woman, whom I somehow had never… Continue reading Review: Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier

book review, historical fiction

Review: One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus

One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus is an alt-history novel, of sorts, in which the US government agreed to the true to life request of the Cheyenne tribe to send white brides to them in order to help integrate the Cheyenne into white society and thus survive. In reality, President Grant refused, but Jim… Continue reading Review: One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus

book review, historical fiction

Review: Fled by Meg Keneally

Based on the historical figure Mary Bryant, Fled by Meg Keneally follows the extraordinary journey of late 18th century Jenny from Cornwall to The Sydney Cove Penal Colony and all the raging seas and lives that could have been in between. When Jenny's fisherman/smuggler father dies, Jenny must find work to help support her mother… Continue reading Review: Fled by Meg Keneally

book review, historical fiction

Review: The Orphan’s Song by Lauren Kate

The Orphan's Song by Lauren Kate transports the reader to dazzling, romantic, and beautiful 18th century Venice. Violetta is an orphan at the Incurables, a hospital and orphanage where girls are raised in the musical arts to eventually perform in the prestigious Coro (where once sworn, a girl must never sing outside its walls.) From… Continue reading Review: The Orphan’s Song by Lauren Kate

historical fiction, history

Review: Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks

About seven years ago I read Year of Wonder by Geraldine Brooks and really enjoyed it. Caleb's Crossing has been on my to-read list for a while, so when I found it at my local used book store, I finally decided it was time to read it. Taking place in the 17th century, Caleb's Crossing… Continue reading Review: Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks

book review, historical fiction, history

Review: Elizabeth of Bohemia by David Elias

Elizabeth of Bohemia was the daughter of King James and the granddaughter of Mary, Queen of Scots. While Elizabeth Stuart may not be as famous as her grandmother or father, I was curious to learn about her life through David Elias's new novel. From a young age, Elizabeth's life seemed to be marked be death… Continue reading Review: Elizabeth of Bohemia by David Elias

writer, writing

Interrupting the book reviews for a message of self-reflection

I've been thinking about writing this post for a while, but I wanted to formulate everything in my head first. Writing this was also a matter of overcoming some fear, as I want to talke about mistakes I've made in the past. Humans will inevitably always make mistakes. What's important in moving forward is acknowledging… Continue reading Interrupting the book reviews for a message of self-reflection

book review, historical fiction, history

Review: The Man Who Could Be King by John Ripin Miller

The Man Who Could Be King by John Ripin Miller follows a young aide-de-camp of George Washington during the threat of internal revolt within the Continental faction in Newburgh, News York. King reads very much like a primary source diary of the time, however, Miller's Josiah Stockbridge is a fabrication and amalgamation of the experiences… Continue reading Review: The Man Who Could Be King by John Ripin Miller

book review, historical fiction

Review: The Widow’s War by Sally Gunning

Set in early 1760s Cape Cod, The Widow's War by Sally Gunning follows the story of Lyddie Berry after losing her husband to the sea. By modern standards, Lyddie is a young widow at 39, but the community and the law treat her as if she is a helpless, elderly woman. Lyddie has no choice… Continue reading Review: The Widow’s War by Sally Gunning

book review, history

Review: Barracoon by Zora Neale Hurston

Long after the slave trade had ended, slavers and merchants would still travel to the West coast of Africa to illegally purchase new "property," while at the same time avoiding any nation's govt ships to bring the "contraband" to the US. Such was the case with Cudjo Lewis in the early 1860s, right before the… Continue reading Review: Barracoon by Zora Neale Hurston