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Out Front the Following Sea by Leah Angstman

Set in 1689 New England, Out Front the Following Sea by Leah Angstman follows Ruth Miner, a young woman accused of Witchcraft after the death of her family. After being ostracized from her community, Ruth sets out on her own to reconnect with childhood friend Owen Townsend for help. Serving as the first mate of… Continue reading Out Front the Following Sea by Leah Angstman

book review, historical fiction, history

Review: Daughter of the King by Kerry Chaput

Daughter of the King by Kerry Chaput follows French Huguenot (Protestant) Isabelle Collete as she continually fights for survival in a Catholic country. Opening in La Rochelle, France in 1661, Isabelle and her mother are all that remain of their family. Huguenots are being persecuted, tortured, and killed in the streets. Everyday, Isabelle walks the… Continue reading Review: Daughter of the King by Kerry Chaput

book review, historical fiction

Review: The Highland Witch by Susan Fletcher

The Highland Witch (entitled Corrag or Witch's Light in some countries) by Susan Fletcher is based on the events of the 1692 Glencoe Massacre of Clan MacDonald, told from the perspective of a outsider named Corrag. The massacre occured after the MacDonald Clan swore their oath (albeit by a forced hand) to King William "too… Continue reading Review: The Highland Witch by Susan Fletcher

book review, historical fiction, history

Review: Tides of Fortunes by Julia Brannan

Book 6 in Julia's Brannan's Jacobite Chronicles, Tides of Fortune, is a worthy conclusion to the epic series. The final installment was engaging, enthralling, compelling, and filled with suspense if Alex and Beth would finally discover the truth and reunite. Alex and Beth, still thinking the other dead, seemingly start new lives--albeit a far cry… Continue reading Review: Tides of Fortunes by Julia Brannan

book review, historical fiction

Review: The Rebel Nun by Marj Charlier

  The Rebel Nun by Marj Charlier tells the little-known true story of 6th-century nun Clotild who leads a rebellion for the rights and freedom for her sisters. The story takes place in medieval France at the monestary of the Holy Cross where, after the death of the progressive-thinking (for the time) abbess, the male-led… Continue reading Review: The Rebel Nun by Marj Charlier

book review, historical fiction

Review: The Brief and True Report of Temperance Flowerdew by Denise Heinze

The Brief and True Report of Temperance Flowerdew by Denise Heinze is a short (hey, the title doesn't lie) and vibrant read about two women surviving in the starving Jamestown colony in 1609. Temperance Flowerdew and her maid, Lily, set out with the Virginia Company fleet to sail across the ocean for a second chance… Continue reading Review: The Brief and True Report of Temperance Flowerdew by Denise Heinze

historical fiction, history

Review: Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks

About seven years ago I read Year of Wonder by Geraldine Brooks and really enjoyed it. Caleb's Crossing has been on my to-read list for a while, so when I found it at my local used book store, I finally decided it was time to read it. Taking place in the 17th century, Caleb's Crossing… Continue reading Review: Caleb’s Crossing by Geraldine Brooks

book review, historical fiction, history

Review: Elizabeth of Bohemia by David Elias

Elizabeth of Bohemia was the daughter of King James and the granddaughter of Mary, Queen of Scots. While Elizabeth Stuart may not be as famous as her grandmother or father, I was curious to learn about her life through David Elias's new novel. From a young age, Elizabeth's life seemed to be marked be death… Continue reading Review: Elizabeth of Bohemia by David Elias

book review, historical fiction, history

Review: The Man Who Could Be King by John Ripin Miller

The Man Who Could Be King by John Ripin Miller follows a young aide-de-camp of George Washington during the threat of internal revolt within the Continental faction in Newburgh, News York. King reads very much like a primary source diary of the time, however, Miller's Josiah Stockbridge is a fabrication and amalgamation of the experiences… Continue reading Review: The Man Who Could Be King by John Ripin Miller

book review, history

Review: Barracoon by Zora Neale Hurston

Long after the slave trade had ended, slavers and merchants would still travel to the West coast of Africa to illegally purchase new "property," while at the same time avoiding any nation's govt ships to bring the "contraband" to the US. Such was the case with Cudjo Lewis in the early 1860s, right before the… Continue reading Review: Barracoon by Zora Neale Hurston