book review, historical fiction

Review: Glorious Boy by Aimee Liu

  Glorious Boy highlights a place often overlooked in WWII fiction: the Andaman Islands. Located between India and Thailand, the Andamans were part of British Colonial India. On the eve of WWII, American Anthropologist Claire marries British surgeon Shep Durant. Shep is soon posted to the Andamans as a colonial doctor, and Claire takes the opportunity… Continue reading Review: Glorious Boy by Aimee Liu

book review, historical fiction, history

Review: Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark Sullivan

  Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark Sullivan tells the amazing true story of an 18-year-old Italian boy named Pino Lella. This novel is very much a coming of age story as it is a story of WWII. Pino comes of age against the disturbing back drop of war, which drastically shapes the rest of… Continue reading Review: Beneath a Scarlet Sky by Mark Sullivan

book review, history

Review: Bomb Girls: Britains’ Secret Army: The Munitions Women of World War II by Jacky Hyams

  Bomb Girls by Jacky Hyams examines the important, yet often forgotten work of the female munitions factory workers in the UK during WWII. Hyams provides historical context and research as a foundation before the book moves into real accounts from women who worked in the factories. Hyams interviewed several women who worked in munitions… Continue reading Review: Bomb Girls: Britains’ Secret Army: The Munitions Women of World War II by Jacky Hyams

book review, historical fiction

Review: The Aftermath by Rhidian Brook

The Aftermath by Rhidian Brook depicts a time and place not often depicted in literature: post-WWII Germany--specifically, Hamburg in 1946. The Aftermath tells the story of a British officer, his wife, and their young son sharing a requisitioned home with a German man and his teenaged daughter. This situation proves ripe for drama and clashing relationships… Continue reading Review: The Aftermath by Rhidian Brook

book review, history

Review: I Am Terezin by Richard D. Bank

I Am Terezin by Richard D. Bank is a memoir (of sorts) told from the point of view of the Czech fortress city-turned-concentration camp Terezin, or Theresienstadt as the Germans called it. If that sounds confusing to you, essentially the book is creative non-fiction written in the first person "by Terezin" through author Richard D. Bank.… Continue reading Review: I Am Terezin by Richard D. Bank

book review, historical fiction, history

Review: All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr Amazon blurb: From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II. Marie-Laure… Continue reading Review: All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

history

Remembering Hiroshima & Nagasaki 70 Years Later

The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki have stuck with me ever since I first learned about them. As they should - as they should for most people, I think. On August 6, 1945, "Little Boy" was detonated 2,000 feet above the city of Hiroshima in a blast of around 12 to 15,000 tons of TNT.… Continue reading Remembering Hiroshima & Nagasaki 70 Years Later